scholarships
Sue Sexton with photo of her father Dr. Ewell HuntA Baby for a Chicken

Lubbock physician's legacy lives on through scholarship

Over the course of 50 years, O.W. “Babe” English, MD, and Ewell L. Hunt, MD, covered the gamut of health care needs—from treating the common cold to major operations. Sue Sexton, Hunt’s daughter, recalls her father making house calls to deliver babies and receiving payment in chickens or eggs or whatever the new parents could afford to give.

In 1934, O.W. “Babe” English, MD, and Ewell L. Hunt, MD, opened a general practice partnership in the downtown Lubbock high-rise then known as the Myrick Building. English had been practicing for about eight years as one of only 16 physicians in Lubbock (for a population of about 24,000) when Hunt joined him, according to a Jan. 22, 1984, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal article.

Over the next 50 years, they covered the gamut of health care needs — from treating the common cold to performing major operations. Sue Sexton, Hunt’s daughter, recalls her father making house calls to deliver babies and receiving payment in chickens or eggs or whatever the new parents could afford to give.

The duo stayed busy seeing an average of 65 patients a day and delivering about 40 babies each month, the Avalanche-Journal article states. In total, they performed about 750 surgeries together before they quit doing surgical procedures in 1975 but continued their practice until the mid-1980s.


Legacies live on

Today, the legacies of these two physicians to the Lubbock medical community live on through scholarship support at TTUHSC, thanks to their families and their patients.

“Their patients loved them and they had such a love for caring for people,” Sexton said. “They were lively, funny, attentive, and even similar in stature, and they were together all the time until their deaths the same year in 1990.”

When Texas Tech University School of Medicine opened in 1972, they both served as associate clinical professors of surgery. They each received the prestigious Award of Hippocrates from the Lubbock County Medical Society (now Lubbock-Crosby-Garza Medical Society), and Hunt is quoted as saying they were closer to one another than to their own brothers.

Hunt’s West Texas and Texas Tech roots go even further back. His great-grandfather, George M. Hunt, was among Lubbock’s first settlers. The younger Hunt earned his undergraduate degree from Texas Technological College, a member of the first graduating class, and was later honored as a Distinguished Alumnus, being the first graduate to earn a medical degree.

The two men raised a second generation of English-Hunt physicians – Dan English, MD, and Don Hunt, MD. Although the younger doctors attended medical school and established practices in places other than Lubbock, they chose TTUHSC as a place to honor their fathers’ legacies, Sexton said.


Connecting communities

She now oversees the Hunt-English Chancellor’s Scholarship Endowment, established in 1978 to the two Lubbock medical mavens. Sexton said she enjoys staying connected to the medical community through TTUHSC and has met many of the scholarship recipients — including one medical student she recognized during an appointment with her dermatologist.

“He was doing a clinic rotation with my physician,” Sexton said. “It was so fun when we both realized how we knew each other; we had met during a scholarship luncheon honoring the donors.

‘It’s such a joy to meet the students and learn about their hopes and dreams. I’m not in the medical profession, but I was raised around it, and it’s something I feel very close to and always will.

“And I feel very privileged and honored to see firsthand the legacy of two incredible doctors live on through the students at TTUHSC.”

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texas tech university health sciences center
3601 fourth street STOP 6238
Lubbock, TX 79430-6238

(806) 743-2786
givinginfo@ttuhsc.edu
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